Skip to content

The South: Before And After Nov. 2

November 29, 2010

To put some numbers on the changes in state legislatures throughout the South following the midterm elections, here are the before and after tallies:

In Alabama, Democrats held a 60-43 advantage in the House and a 20-15 advantage in the Senate before the midterms. Both chambers flipped. Republicans now hold a 66-39 advantage in the House (not positive if that number includes the four recent party-switchers) and a 22-12 majority in the Senate.

In Arkansas, Democrats held a 71-28 advantage in the House and 27-8 advantage in the Senate before the midterms. That is now down to a 54-46 advantage in the House and a 20-15 advantage in the Senate even as the popular Democratic governor was re-elected.

In Florida, Republicans held a 76-44 advantage in the House and a 26-13 advantage in the Senate before the midterms. That number is now 81-39 in the House and 28-12 in the House.

In Georgia, Republicans held a 103-73 advantage in the House and 34-22 advantage in the Senate before the midterms. They now hold a 113-66 advantage in the House (after party-switchers) and a 35-21 advantage in the Senate.

In Kentucky, Democrats held a 65-35 advantage in the House while the GOP had a 20-17 majority in the Senate pre-midterms. The Democratic advantage in the House is now 58-42 and the Republican majority in the Senate grew to 22-15.

In North Carolina, Democrats held a 68-52 advantage in the House and a 30-20 advantage in the Senate before the midterms. Republicans won control of both chambers. They hold a 67-52 advantage in the House and a 30-20 advantage in the Senate.

In South Carolina, Republicans held a 73-51 advantage in the House before the midterms. They now have a 75-48 advantage. South Carolina only had House elections this year.

In Tennessee, Republicans had a 51-48 advantage in the House and a 19-14 advantage in the Senate before the midterms. They now have a 68-31 advantage in the House and a 20-13 advantage in the Senate.

In Texas, Republicans had a 76-73 advantage in the House and a 19-12 advantage in the Senate before the midterms. The advantage in the House is now 98-51 for the GOP, while it stayed the same in the Senate. Of interest, a moderate Republican was able to become Speaker of the House last time thanks to the support of the entire Democratic caucus and a few Republicans. That is obviously going to be a much tougher task today.

Besides Mississippi, Virginia and Louisiana also did not hold elections in 2010 (although a State Representative in Louisiana has changed from the Democratic to the Republican Party recently).

No comments yet

What are you thinking?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

Gravatar
WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s