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Thompson Speaks At Postal Union Rally

September 28, 2011

Yesterday, the postal union and supporters across the country held “Save America’s Postal Service” rallies and called on Congress to pass H.R. 1351 which would reverse the 2006 Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act, legislation that requires the postal service to pay 75 years worth of benefits over a 10 year period.

Bennie Thompson was at the rally in Jackson, which took place at union headquarters, and pledged his support of the legislation.

The question is: would this legislation really do anything when all is said and done- or would it just delay the inevitable? The postal service has announced some 3,700 site closures as a way to cut into what is expected to be a $238 billion budget shortfall over the next decade. This includes closing some rural offices as well as duplicative offices in urban areas (five in Jackson are scheduled to get the ax). Barack Obama has given the OK- against the union’s desires- to end Saturday delivery, another cost cutting measure.

Speaking of the union, Thompson has received $56,000 from the American Poster Workers Union over his career making them his 15th largest contributor. He obviously has good reason to see them avoid any layoffs.

While the postal service and the union will take their share of the blame for the situation they are in, the bottom line is that they are an outdated model. There is not a whole lot you can do about that. The telegram was once the main source, or at least the fastest source, of communication in America. But like all good things, its day has come and gone, regardless of what Congress did or didn’t do or how many telegram operators had to find other careers.

Further, competition has hurt USPS. They haven’t been able to keep up with FedEx and UPS. The main reason for choosing USPS today? To mail letters for $0.44. FedEx and UPS certainly can’t compete with that, but looking at the postal service’s bottom line- neither can they.

In addition to the rally in Jackson and Hattiesburg that the Clarion-Ledger covered, there was also supposed to be one in Tupelo. However, just one person showed up. An employee who drove all the way from Cleveland to attend. At least she was able to express her views to the Daily Journal.

8 Comments leave one →
  1. catty14 permalink
    September 28, 2011 2:09 pm

    It is and has been obvious….The Postal System is another government program that won’t work. It needs to be privatized; put out for competitive bid if you will. Just this past week a $3,000 check was lost in the mail and I had to stop payment, Another big, big issue is how the Postal System has decided to designate where we live. For many of us our postal address is far, far removed from where we actually live but regardless, they insist upon making our postal address to conform to their needs instead of being representative of our locations. Your mortgage might give one legal property address but by damn the PO will not conform even to legal addresses. The USPS has to go. And hopefully the SEIU can follow.

    • kippost1306 permalink
      September 28, 2011 3:48 pm

      The post office is semi-private. “But unlike other private businesses, the Postal Service is exempt from paying federal taxes. USPS can borrow money at discounted rates, and can condemn and acquire private property under governmental rights of eminent domain. The USPS does get some taxpayer support. Around $96 million is budgeted annually by Congress for the “Postal Service Fund.” These funds are used to compensate USPS for postage-free mailing for all legally blind persons and for mail-in election ballots sent from US citizens living overseas. A portion of the funds also pays USPS for providing address information to state and local child support enforcement agencies.”

      The U.S. Post Office is a $45 billion dollar plus business. It is not a government subsidized agency. Your opinion is fine but get the FACTS correct. By the way, here is another fact:

      “The only reason the Postal Service is in trouble is because of the Postal Act of 2006. This act passed by a lame duck congress in the dead of night by voice vote requiring the USPS to prepay 75 years of pension obligations over a 10 year period. No other organization in the country is required by law to do so. If you take away the payments the USPS has put into this trust fund they are actually in the black and in no danger of default.”

      • Republican Dawg permalink
        September 28, 2011 4:16 pm

        Let me get these numbers straight. If the USPS paid nothing into this fund it would save $5 billion a year for 10 years- or $50 billion. Right?

        How does that cover the $10 billion they lost last year and the $238 billion they are expected to lose over the next 10 years?

        I understand the role postal service plays in rural communities. Could care less about what the unions in Jackson or other cities have to say. But understand their importance where I grew up. That said, what reason do we have to believe that they have a successful business strategy that doesn’t involve losing billions of dollars every year. Last time I checked, it was getting worse not better and they are getting less relevant not more.

        • marmie permalink
          September 28, 2011 7:00 pm

          When mailclerks make over $40 per hour to sell stamps, the USPS has real problems. When the hiring practices are bases on affirmative action and other political correctness, we all have a big problem.

      • catty14 permalink
        September 28, 2011 10:29 pm

        Here are some facts: The Post Office takes in income through sales of stamps and charges for sending mail and packages, etc.. So not only are we footing a bill to subsidize the PO but it is charging us for that service too. So in reality, it is a burden. It doesn’t work like so many government programs and and services and it needs to be privatized. And I’m not talking about the trucking service, airmail service which is under contract, I am talking about creating a private company that would be looking to make a profit; therefore hopefully improve service. I have counted as many as 15 peiople in line at the PO….just as one of the clerks decides to take a break. It’s more of a bureaucracy; more of a union shop than an efficiently run operation. .

        • Ron Williams permalink
          September 29, 2011 4:10 pm

          Catty14

          You are right. It should be privatized. But do you know what kind of fit my Old, White, republican Mother in law would have if Stamps go up to a dollar?

          Our society is not demographically ready for that change. We have a genration of Conservative and Democratic Americans who love the Idea of sending a letter for less than 50 cents.

  2. Doug permalink
    September 28, 2011 2:53 pm

    Nuff said!

  3. Cal York permalink
    October 17, 2011 9:43 am

    Privatize the Postal Service, which is a right written into the US Constitution for the people, and your price of postage will go up by at least 5 times. The postal service can do business for under 1 cent on the dollar, while private companies say the first 5 cents of every dollar will go into admininstration fees. THAT IS 5 TIMES HIGHER. And skimming!!!. The USPS, also swears in there employees to Protect Your Mail…….Does UPS, FEDEX, or DHL do that? NO! It is a Federal Offense to destory mail, or mail property. Is it that way for the private companies? USPS can make treaties with other countries. The Postal Act of 2006, pushed through Congress in the dead of night by a GOP controlled House and Senate, is a payback for campaign contributions by UPS, FEDEX, and DHL, to dismantle the Postal Service. Benjamin Franklin made the Post Office, and all countries in the world are modeled after this. If UPS, FEDEX, or DHL had to pay into a retirement fund like the USPS does, they would be worst off than the Postal Service. Privatizating the Postal Service is the Stupidest Idea I have ever heard.

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